• Mathematics,  Philosophy,  Physics

    Quantum Theory and Sāńkhya for Beginners

    Many people have expressed interest in understanding quantum theory—both in terms of the underlying scientific problems, as well as what solutions could look like. While I have provided technical explanations in the past, they often prove inadequate for those who may not follow the technicalities. This post, rather ambitiously hopes to cover that shortfall. It covers the basic mathematical ideas underlying quantum theory, the nature of the quantum problem, what its semantic solution looks like, and the type of mathematics needed to formulate a formal scientific solution. For the sake of simplicity, I will cover the non-relativistic version of the theory, and then describe the unification problem. Wherever necessary, I…

  • Philosophy,  Physics,  Religion

    Why Sāńkhya Is Important for Quantum Theory

    This post discusses the relevance of the idea of “gross” and “subtle” matter in Sāńkhya to the problems of prediction in quantum theory, highlighting the solution using everyday examples. I also discuss how the attempts to divorce “gross” and “subtle” matter, or reduce “subtle” matter to “gross” matter, lead to the widespread proliferation of alternate “spiritualities”, which are thriving on the misconceptions about the quantum problem: wherever you look, you can find impersonalistic or voidistic “spirituality” based on a flawed interpretation of the quantum phenomena. The post discusses why a solution to this problem based on Sāńkhya would not only produce a scientific theory and advance science to a newer…

  • Overview,  Philosophy,  Physics

    Quantum Motion – Elevators vs. Escalators

    While going down in an elevator, it recently occurred to me that the elevator doesn’t move unless we indicate the floor it has to go to, quite different from an escalator which keeps moving regardless of whether anyone has anywhere to go to. This difference is a useful way to understand how quantum “motion” is different from classical motion. This post explains the difference using the elevator vs. escalator analogy. The motion of the elevator explicitly employs meaning and purpose, while the motion of the escalator doesn’t. The difference helps us see why addressing many scientific problems needs a revision to our analogies about nature, and what such analogical shifts…