• Physics,  Sociology

    Atomic Theory and Social Media

    In classical physics, each particle interacts (through force) with every other particle all the time. In quantum theory, some particles interact with some other particles some of the time. This model of interaction can be compared to people on social media—you don’t talk to all the people in the world all the time; you rather make some ‘friends’ and you talk to some of these friends some of the time. Quantum causality works just like people-to-people interaction rather than particle-to-particle interaction. This difference is unintuitive in the context of physics, but quite intuitive if we were to compare these particles to people. This inevitably means that to understand the problem…

  • Philosophy,  Physics

    Sāńkhya and Modern Atomism

    Sāńkhya has a theory of atomism, which is quite different than the theory of modern atomism. The modern description of atoms is based on the distinction between matter and force whereas the Sāńkhya description is based on the distinction between words and meanings. Clearly, we cannot expect the twoso descriptions to be similar, and making them similar or equivalent isn’t the point of the post. The key question is: Can we study what modern science calls atoms and molecules using Sāńkhya? If yes, how would this study be different from the study of atoms and molecules at present? This post answers many such questions, including why the particles of modern…

  • Law,  Philosophy,  Physics,  Religion

    Quantum Theory and Human Experience

    That quantum theory tells us something new about the material world, as compared to classical physics, is undisputed. The dispute is regarding what the new thing is that quantum theory is telling us. Accordingly, there are numerous interpretations of quantum theory, some even by those who claim to follow the Vedic traditions. However, in none of these interpretations do we find a clear articulation of the nature of free will, how this free will interacts with matter, the question of right and wrong action, which then leads to moral consequences, and how such consequences shape the future experiences. The crux of Vedic philosophy is not a theory of matter, but…