Choices – Vedic Perspective

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    • #10087

      How are the choices that we make are determined. Is it one’s Karma or Guna? An individual is a product of his past “samskaras” which becomes his nature in this life. While one is trying to make choices these “samskaras” are always influencing the choices one make.

      When God has scripted this world, the role that one plays is not determined by God. How does and individual “choose” what role he plays and once a choice is made, how does one know that’s the right role?

    • #10089

      You should read some books. A systematic step-by-step process is needed for everyone. Because otherwise whatever information is given is interpreted according to previous ideas, and it takes a much longer time for the person to grasp, and more importantly, effect a change.

      How are the choices that we make are determined. Is it one’s Karma or Guna?

      Matter automatically creates a desire, or forces a situation where we are compelled to make a choice. Just like bureaucrats bring a proposal to a minister and he signs, or rejects it. And then the bureaucrat will bring another proposal. If the bureaucrat is bad, then he will always bring bad proposals and give the impression that it is the only possible proposal. Then out of frustration the minister will sign it. This is the situation at present. We have got this body and mind as a bad servant. It is a servant, but it only gives bad proposals, and you ultimately accept it.

      An individual is a product of his past “samskaras” which becomes his nature in this life. While one is trying to make choices these “samskaras” are always influencing the choices one make.

      Like I said earlier, we have got a bad past. Everyone has a bad past. You don’t want to accept it, so you are asking the same thing in many ways. This bad past has created a bad servant, and that servant is now manipulating you by giving you mostly bad ideas. You think you are the master of your servant, but actually the servant is controlling you. Just like bureaucrats control the ministers, even though the minster is supposed to be in control of the bureaucrat.

      You are relying on the bureaucrat becoming a good servant, and I’m telling you again and again that it will never happen. You have to become servant of the Lord, and then the Lord will give you ideas by which you can control the bad bureaucrat. Until you do that, you have no alternative. You will keeping thinking of yourself as a master, and you will always remain a servant.

      When God has scripted this world, the role that one plays is not determined by God. How does and individual “choose” what role he plays and once a choice is made, how does one know that’s the right role?

      Everything is happening automatically. Lord Krishna says in Bhagavad-Gita: yantra-rudhani mayaya, which means this body is like a machine of illusions, on which the soul is sitting. The machine is in autopilot, and it automatically produces false ideas, desires. Unless you have a spiritual goal, you will accept everything that the machine shows as the only possible reality. To see something else, you must know an alternative reality. Material energy will not show you that alternative. Just like a bad bureaucrat doesn’t want the minister to know the truth because by the truth the minister can become independent and then start dictating terms. The bureaucrat only wants the minister to remain ignorant, helpless, and dependent on the bureaucrat.

      You have the false idea that by your samskara you will get something good because you don’t know that this material energy wants to keep you a servant. Nothing good will come out your samskara. How clearly can we say it? Your so-called samskara will produce one devious proposal after another, and you will spend your life following them. To change this life, we must get another source of information — which is God and His devotees. If you keep depending on your samksara you are like man sitting on an autopilot machine going here and there.

    • #10093

      What books are you referring to?

      Even after becoming a devotee of the Lord, the challenge to make the right choices still remain? How does one understand the choice that make is something inspired by the Lord? Is that by the outcome of the choice, favorable to devotional service?

    • #10094

      What books are you referring to?

      If you like you can read “Conceiving the Inconceivable”.

      Even after becoming a devotee of the Lord, the challenge to make the right choices still remain? How does one understand the choice that make is something inspired by the Lord? Is that by the outcome of the choice, favorable to devotional service?

      Yes, choices are hard. A choice means a sacrifice of something less important for something more important. Generally, soma or our pleasure is sacrificed, for agni or a higher purpose. But this proves to be insufficient. So, God’s pleasure is prioritized over our pleasure. But some people also kill in the name of God’s pleasure. So, ultimately, we must know what pleases God, and that requires knowing God. Until one completely knows what God likes and dislikes, in what situation He will choose what, choices remain difficult. But at least the principle is God’s pleasure.

      There is a system of philosophy called Mimamsa, which is devoted to the question: What is duty? Just like Vedanta starts by the aphorism, “Now, therefore, let’s inquire into Brahman”, similarly, Mimamsa begins by the proposition: “Now, therefore, let’s inquire into dharma”. It is by far the largest and most complex system of philosophy. Just as the simplified conclusion of Absolute Truth is Krishna, similarly, the simplified version of duty is the pleasure of Krishna.

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Choices – Vedic Perspective

by Vivek Amin Time to read: <1 min
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